Here is a list of all currently available graphics cards that are DirectX 11 capable, along with links to product details for each, courtesy of Amazon.

This list, revision 19, is current as of April, 2014. See the list.

What is a GTX 465? With the release of the powerful DirectX 11 GTX 470 and 480, Nvidia wanted to have an option with a lower price point to compete with sales of the Radeon 5850.

This price point as of today’s release is $279.99 + shipping on The card still uses the GF100 based Fermi 40nm architecture that is now in full production. See how the 465 compares.

In our last Green Computing Review, we looked the 80 Plus Bronze PSU from Antec, the EA-430D Green. We built that power supply into our home theater PC. This time around, we need something with a little more kick to power our gaming machine.

In addition to our Core i7 860, 4GB of G.Skill ECO RAM, X-Fi, Blu-ray, and hard disks, we needed to make sure we had enough power for our GTX 470. See how the OCZ handles it.

SolidlyStated recently completed its 3 part series of Solid Reviews for EVGA Nvidia cards, spanning entry-level to high-end gaming. Each article is packed with info. In this summary, we will pit all 3 cards head-to-head and aggregate the results for them at both stock and overclocked speeds. See the results.

This article is an in-depth look at the EVGA GTX 470. The GT400 series GPU, nicknamed ‘Fermi‘, is designed for high-end gaming and is the first Nvidia chip to support DirectX 11.

Our in-depth look will solidly state the difference between available part numbers, cover all features, and display extensive overclocking benchmarks. Next, Let’s Examine this GTX 470

If you have owned a GT200 series card, then you might know they all share the same Nvidia drivers. This allows you to switch between, say, a GTS 250 and GTX 260, which works with no fuss at all. You just swap cards and reboot. However, stepping up from a 200 series card to a GTX 470 will result in Windows not even recognizing the new hardware. See the solution.